Watching and Learning in Life

To watch and learn in life, is something we all do. We all watch someone fail, we hopefully learn from that failure that we were able to witness.

Something that doesn’t often happen is While we are learning are we watching? Most times people are not because the learning curve may not allow you to watch as you learn.

Next time a period of time comes while learning try to watch and see if you can. I tried it and failed; that is ok though. I know the next time even if I fail; I will fail forward.

Thanks for reading,
Arthur Poston

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Squinting Through the Fog?

"My brother, here’s your WiRE for today ==>"

Squinting Through the Fog

If any of you lacks wisdom, let him ask God
. . . and it will be given him—James 1:5

God knows what’s right in every circumstance. We do not. “There is a way that seems right to a man, but its end is the way to death” (Proverbs 14:12). And yet, God installs us as decision-makers nonetheless. He intends us to struggle through, and answer, tough questions throughout our lives: Should I take the job? Should I marry the girl? Am I becoming the man God intends me to become? How should I deal with pain and fear and temptation? Tough questions, indeed. Huge implications.

King Solomon was an epic decision-maker. God told him, “I give you a wise and discerning mind, so that none like you has been before you and none like you shall arise after you” (1 Kings 3:12). Fortunately for the rest of us, Solomon passed along some of that God-given wisdom, in the form of the Book of Proverbs.

For tough questions, Solomon wrote, we must look first to God (Proverbs 3:5-6). One way to do that, since he empowers us as agents of his wisdom, is actually to look to our brothers in Christian community (Proverbs 11:14; James 5:19-20). Wrote Solomon, “a wise man listens to advice” (Proverbs 12:15). Counsel from other men is one of our most powerful tools. We needn’t use it for every question. But, for the toughest ones, we must.

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Speak Responsibly

"My brother, here’s your WiRE for today ==>"

Speak Responsibly

Be watchful, stand firm in the faith, act like men, be strong.
Let all that you do be done in love—1 Corinthians 16:13-14

Whether it’s two of us or twelve of us or more, when we gather in Christian community, we’re to speak truth to one another, truth motivated by love (Ephesians 4:15). Truth in love—it sounds simple, actually . . . straightforward. And sometimes it is. Many times, though, it’s anything but simple or straightforward. And, in those times, we men don’t typically fare too well. I mean, the mess and complexity of life can make speaking truth in love daunting and uncomfortable—for example, when it requires we challenge a brother or admonish him; when it requires we call-out a brother or call him back from sin. So it’s a rare group of men indeed who are willing to speak truth in love even when it’s hard. We’ve got to be that kind of men.

For us to be that kind, though, we must first be another kind: men who take time to know one another. You see, except in a few cases, it’s irresponsible to “speak truth” to any man without knowing his story. We’re one body, all following our King, Jesus Christ, but we’re also all different, with different designs, different functions, different experiences (Romans 12:4-5). For community to work, for truth to flow properly, we must understand and appreciate each other. And we begin by telling our stories. If we don’t begin there, we’re likely to damage community and to do damage to each other—like when we give advice and try to “fix” a person, or a situation, we don’t fully understand.

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Questions? How to move forward…..

What do we do when there isn’t a way to fix a problem in your relationship with the conversation?

Probe by asking questions of yourself:

What is my part in this?
Is there a fix?
What questions could be asked to probe the situation?

There could possibly be other questions that would need to be asked of yourself while trying to get to a version of the truth before confronting the other party. Time is not on your side when contemplating these issues. A lot of time can be lost and you left in limbo asking questions of yourself. The time you take for yourself to propose and create these items of and for yourself be sure to use them “the questions”as soon as possible.

Conversation is still crucial and being in a calm and controlled manner is best. Anger and raised voices do nothing to help either side.

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Wake-up Call

"My brother, here’s your WiRE for today ==>"

Wake-up Call

. . . faith apart from works is dead—James 2:26

Imagine yourself, for a moment, standing before our Lord and Master, Jesus Christ. Imagine feeling, at first, a bit apprehensive. Imagine lifting your eyes to his. Imagine his face, when you meet his gaze. Imagine his strength, his goodness. Imagine the sound of his voice as he, like the master in his Parable of the Talents, speaks these words: “Well done, good and faithful servant” (Matthew 25:14-30). How would that feel—from the one who sacrificed his life for yours—that he’s pleased with the life you’ve lived?

Each of us has work to do before weactually stand face-to-face with Jesus. “He creates each of us by Christ Jesus to join him in the work he does, the good work he has gotten ready for us to do, work we had better be doing” (Ephesians 2:10 MSG). Like the servants in the parable, we’re too given resources for the Master’s work. They were given money; we’re given money too, but also time, energy, natural talents, spiritual gifts, and help from the Holy Spirit. We must waste these resources no more. We must spend them for his work—not just for ourselves.

We must also, though, check our hearts. Doing “good work” isn’t about earning our way into Heaven (Ephesians 2:8-9). Rather, it’s about trusting our Master and following him into a better kind of life.

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